Historical Poker Hands

Relive Historical Poker Hands
Texas Holdem No-Limit WORLD SERIES OF POKER (WSOP) 2007
- $10,000 Main Event: Silencing the Lam
Jerry Yang
VS Tuan Lam
Best hand percentage Pre-Flop The Flop The Turn The River
Jerry Yang 52.6% 12.0% 13.6%
Tuan Lam 47.0% 88.0% 86.4%
Action:
Jerry Yang enter the final table as one of the short loads.
He gets out combating and speedily grasps the chip guide.
Yang’s aggressive play provides him also a giant break off guidel coming into heads-up play opposite to Tuan Lam, holding 80% of the chips in play at around 102 million.
Lam has 25.4 million. With the blinds at 400,000/800,000 and a 100,000-chip bet, Yang looks down at 8 -8  and makes an increase to 2.3 million.
Lam seems down at A -Q  and progresses all-in over the peak. Yang takes a time and finally calls the wage, putting Lam’s play-offs life at wager.
However, when the flop shows 5 -Q -9 , Lam takes a throttlehold on the hand.
Yang will require to catch one of the outstanding eights or running cards to win.
When the turn carries the 7 , though, it adds four guts hot outs to Yang’s two residual eights.
The river carries the 6  and calamity for Tuan Lam, giving Yang a winning nine-high straight, the World Series of Poker Major Incident bracelet and $8.25 million.
Analysis:
Yang builds a regular 3x the large blind with his 8 -8 . Lam, deliberating Yang has been playing very antagonistically, has no choice however to move all-in with his short load and A -Q .
Once the flop shows down, Lam becomes a colossal preferred.
However, Yang gets fortunate and catches two running cards to do a straight.
The strike looks much shoddier than it was at that moment.
When the money went in, Yang was simply a insignificant favorite for the coin flip with his pocket pair.
Texas Holdem No-Limit WORLD SERIES OF POKER (WSOP) 2006
- $10,000 Main Event: Talking Your Way to a competition
Jamie Gold
VS Paul Wasicka
Best hand percentage Pre-Flop The Flop The Turn The River
Jamie Gold 28.6% 86.5% 95.5%
Paul Wasicka 71.0% 13.5% 4.5%
Action:
Jamie Gold go into heads-up and play with a colossal chip guide.
Having grabbed the chip guide untimely in the competition and gathering chips the whole mode. Entering the heads-up competition, Gold out-chips, Paul Wasicka 4.5-1.
After some hands of heads-up, Wasicka has a load of more or less 16.2 million, while Gold has a massive load of around 73.9 million.
The hand starts with blinds at 200,000/400,000 and a 50,000 bet.
Gold completes from the switch with Q -9 . Wasicka looks down at T -T  and increases to 1.3 million.
Gold do the call.
The flop shows Q -8 -5 . Wasicka wages out 1.5 million.
Gold, serenely assert he is all-in.
Wasicka tanks while Gold enters one of his actually infamous converses.
Ultimately Wasicka, considering Gold is on a draw, does the call.
When Gold turns up his pair of queens, the young phantom is down to two outs.
The turn carries the A , and the 4   river card close the deal.
Gold is the new World Series of Poker Major Incident Winner and takes home $12 million and the impressive Major Incident bracelet.
Analysis:
Jamie Gold shuffles the button yet once more; a very scrawny play, particularly heads-up.
If you have a hand value playing, you should absolutely carry it in for an elevated from the button.
However, Gold chooses to shuffle and Wasicka discovers himself with an excellent hand heads-up. His T -T  makes for an excellent increasing hand and he makes it 1.3 million to go, around 3x the big blind.
Gold do his call with place and his gigantic chip load and we observe a flop.
The Q -8 -5  carries trouble for Wasicka, with an overcard to his tens.
He makes a persistence wage of just over half the pot, 1.5 million.
Gold then over wages all-in.
Just little hands prior, a very comparable hand had played out.
In a three-way pan with Wasicka and Michael Binger, Gold shuffle the button and then over wage all-in after a wage from one of his antagonists.
Binger finishes up calling with peak pair, peak kicker and Gold drew out to a straight.
With this clean hand in Wasicka’s brain, he recognized Gold was able of quick playing draws. The flop made fairly little eventual draws.
Accordingly, Wasicka went with his read on Gold and ultimately made the call.
Regrettably for him, Gold held a pair of queens and Wasicka was drawing very slight.
Texas Holdem No-Limit WORLD SERIES OF POKER (WSOP) 2005
- $10,000 Main Event: From rag to riches
Joseph Hachem
VS Steven Dannenmann
Best hand percentage Pre-Flop The Flop The Turn The River
Joseph Hachem 26.0% 83.3% 93.2%
Steven Dannenmann 72.5% 5.0% 6.8%
Action:
After seven days of playing, the following outspreaded at the final table only about half an hour into the heads-up play:
Hachem and Dannenmann had correspondingly $40 million and $16.35 million in chips at the openings of this hand.
The blinds were $150,000-$300,000 with a $50,000 bet!
Steven Dannenmann increased to $700,000 with the A -3  and Hachem do a apparently loose call with the 7 -3 . The flop shows 4 -5 -6 .
Hachem checked his straight and Steven bet $700,000 into the pan.
Hachem re-increased to $1,700,000 and Steven flat called holding only ace-high and an open ended straight draw.
The turn was the A .
Hachem wages out $2,000,000 and Steven increased to $5,000,000.
Hachem went all-in and Steven immediately called.
Steven was drawing to a knot with one of the three outstanding sevens on the river.
The river was the 4  and Joseph Hachem became the new World Winner, winning $7,500,000!
Analysis:
Increasing with any ace in heads-up play is a fine play, however $700,000 is a small move up.
Certainly, it was hardly twice the large blind.
With $1,050,000 in the pan and only $400,000 more to call, Hachem is receiving the right price to call with any two cards, particularly being the chip head.
Hachem calls appropriately the move up and checks on the flop in an effort to trap Dannenmann. Steven wages roughly half the pan thinking his ace-high might be the greatest hand.
A logical wage even though the panel is intimidating.
Hachem make a decision not to sluggish play his straight any more and increases the pan one more million.
A good increase since there are moderately little free cards that can potentially harm his hand (in veracity he is in large form however he doesn’t recognize that for sure).
Dannenmann calls and the pan, at the moment, holds $4,850,000, which is more than 25% of Steven’s total load.
The call point toward Steven’s plan which is to distinguish if his ace-high is fine or else he imagines he can outdraw if one of his straight cards strikes.
Also an ace could probably make him the finest hand.
Undeniably, a risky call, however remains practical.
On the turn the A  strikes and that finishes up being a money card for Hachem.
He guides out again with a $2,000,000 wage and Dannenmann, believing his pair of aces is the best hand, increases to $5,000,000.
This is a dangerous position for Steven; on the one hand, his hand is not exceedingly strong and, on the other hand, the panel is risky enough that he doesn’t want to tolerate Hachem to observe the river so inexpensively.
The wage by Hachem is an excellent move since it is little enough to tolerate Steven to believe that he can increase Hachem off his hand by putting in an increase of $3,000,000.
Of course, At this moment, Hachem set Dannenmann all-in and Dannenmann, who, in light of the reality that he was very much pot devoted (50% of his original load was in the pan) and quite probably could have been holding the most excellent hand, do the call.
This last call by Dannenmann is a decision call based less on pan probabilities and more on the possibility of him having the top hand.
Texas Holdem No-Limit WORLD SERIES OF POKER (WSOP) 2004
- $10,000 Main Event: Value-betting until the river
Greg Raymer
VS David Williams
Best hand percentage Pre-Flop The Flop The Turn The River
Greg Raymer 69.8% 66.4% 79.5%
David Williams 29.8% 31.0% 20.5%
Action:
After 6 days of direct and continuous playing, the final hand of the 2004 WORLD SERIES OF POKER (WSOP) was played out.
The two remaining qualified online competitors were Greg “Fossilman” Raymer and the 23years old poker expert David Williams.
Raymer was chief by around 2-to-1 with roughly $17,125,000 chips in opposite to Williams’ $8,240,000, with blinds of $50,000-$100,000.
Williams increased to $300,000 on the button holding the A -4  and Raymer called from the largeblind with the 8 -8 .
The flop shows 4 -2 -5 .
Raymer checked and Williams immediately wage $500,000.
Raymer took his time and then increased to $1,600,000.
Promply, Williams called his wage. The turn carry the 2 .
Raymer confirmed a wage of $2,500,000 and once more Williams immediately called.
The river was the 2 , giving both competitors a full house.
Raymer contemplate for a second before proclaiming he was all-in.
For the first time in the hand, Williams also took at least a second or two previous to calling and turn over his hand face-up earlier than Raymer who had a possibility to do so.
Raymer gazed down at Williams’ card and then turn over the winning hand.
One second later, he increased both his hands in the air and squealed out in delight.
First place provided Greg Raymer $5,000,000 in prize money, the biggest play-offs prize ever won.
Analysis:
Pre-flop, both performers played their hands according to standard poker conjecture.
Raymer strikes a pleasant flop and decided to check-increase the violent Williams, (a smart play).
A check-call would not be an ideal play here since there are a lot of draws on the panel and that would make it so inexpensive on Williams.
Williams also wages properly the flop, since he had a gut-shot straight draw and middle pair with peak kicker.
When he received got check-increased, he should have either stimulated all-in or run away, rather than starting a prototype of calling his short load.
Raymer understood appropriately that he had the most excellent hand all the way and was merely “value- waging” on each round,
As a result Williams pays for frustrating to outdraw Raymer.
Texas Holdem No-Limit WORLD SERIES OF POKER (WSOP) 2003
- $10,000 Main Event: The power of rags
VS Sam Farha
Best hand percentage Pre-Flop The Flop The Turn The River
Chris Moneymaker 36.1% 75.5% 81.8%
Sam Farha 63.9% 24.5% 18.2%
Action:
After playing heads-up for a little hand Chris Moneymaker had the chip guide going into this pan opposite to Sam Farha.
Moneymaker had around $6,600,000 and Farha $1,800,000 in chips.
Farha had the J -T  and increased to $100,000 from the small blind and Moneymaker called with the 5 -4 .
The flop shows J -5 -4 , providing Moneymaker bottom two-pair and Farha peak pair.
Moneymaker checked and Farha waged $175,000.
Moneymaker check-increase $275,000 and Farha moved all-in.
Moneymaker called.
The two-pair held up and even enhanced on the river to a full house.
This hand won Moneymaker the title and $2,500,000 in real money.
Analysis:
Moneymaker played this hand excellently and fascinated Farha for all his chips.
The check on the flop provided Farha the alternative to bluff in case he didn’t hit.
The little check-increased put Farha in a position where he had to make a decision whether his hand was the best or not.
The check-increase is so little to make Farha threw out and if he just calls.
Moneymaker will most likely set him all-in on the turn.
Texas Holdem No-Limit WORLD SERIES OF POKER (WSOP) 2002
- $10,000 Main Event: Semi-bluffing on the flop
Robert Varkonyi
VS Julian Gardner
Best hand percentage Pre-Flop The Flop The Turn The River
Robert Varkonyi 61.0% 66.2% 75.0%
Julian Gardner 39.0% 33.8% 25.0%
Action:
The unsighted were $20,000-$40,000 and the gamble $5,000 when the last hand of the competition was played.
Varkonyi had around a 6-to-1 chip guide going into this pan.
Varkonyi increased $90,000 with the Q -T  and Gardner called with the J -8 . The droop shows Q -4 -4 , giving Varkonyi peak pair and Gardner a flush draw.
Gardner checked and Varkonyi wage $50,000, a little wages.
Gardner is determinate to shift all-in with $765,000 on a semi-bluff.
Varkonyi called. The flush shows on the river, however the 10  gave Varkonyi a full house.
Varkonyi won the title with $2,000,000 in real money.
Analysis:
When Gardner was determinate to bluff Varkonyi, the panel didn’t seem so frightening and he had enough chips to do a considerable increase.
If called Gardner recognizes he is probably to have at least 9 outs to draw out with.
However, Varkonyi do a fine call and his cards held up.
Varkonyi deserved the title and $2,000,000 in real money.
Texas Holdem No-Limit WORLD SERIES OF POKER (WSOP) 2001
- $10,000 Main Event: Being overly aggressive
Phil Hellmuth
VS Carlos Mortensen
Best hand percentage Pre-Flop The Flop The Turn The River
Phil Hellmuth 26.0% 14.3% 18.2%
Carlos Mortensen 74.0% 85.7% 81.8%
Action:
A huge hand appears between the world winners from 1989, Phil Hellmuth and Carlos Mortensen, when the final table was down to five performers.
The blinds were $15,000-$30,000 and the bet was $6,000.
Building the pan $75,000 before the cards were contracted.
Hellmuth shuffled into the pan, Phil Gordon shuffled in from the button, Carlos Mortensen shuffled in, from the little blind and Stan Schrier in the large blind checked.
The four-way pan had $150,000 in it before the droop.
The flop shows Q -9 -4 . Mortensen checked, Schrier checked, Hellmuth wage $60,000 (less then half of the pan), Gordon threw out, Mortensen increased $200,000 and Schrier took about two minutes to threw out, since, he hadn’t comprehend, it was his turn to proceed.
At the moment, the pan had $410,000 in it and Phil Hellmuth, promptly proclaimed that he was affecting all-in with his last $900,000.
Mortensen called and the hands were turned up on the table.
Hellmuth held a Q-T and Mortensen had a Q-J, giving both actors peak pair.
However, Hellmuth had the scrawny kicker.
At this time, Hellmuth had 3 outs to a T for a two pair to strike Mortensen.
On the turn a J strikes, providing Hellmuth an open-finished straight draw and Mortensen peak two pair.
The J helped Hellmuth since it provided him 8 new outs.
However killed his 3 outs to the T. He needed an 8 or a K to strike on the river to do a straight. The A  came on the river and sent Phil Hellmuth out in fifth position.
Analysis:
Hellmuth’s firstwage is a fine wage and it is not large enough to make him pan dedicated.
So he should be able to leave the hand.
When Hellmuth shifted his chips all-in he could merely strike a bluff or make Mortensen put down the better hand.
Since the pan was not increased with four performers, it was improbably that Hellmuth’s hand was the best after he has been check-increased by Mortensen.
Mortensen could embrace any two pair, a set of 9′s or 4′s, AQ, KQ, QJ or the J -T  that would make him the preferred over one pair.
Mortensen might have made similar play with the A -9 , a JT and any Q, in that case Mortensen might have crinkled.
However, that still doesn’t make Hellmuth’s play exactly.
Texas Holdem No-Limit WORLD SERIES OF POKER (WSOP) 2001
- $10,000 Main Event: Trapping with aces
Carlos Mortensen
VS Dewey Tomko
Best hand percentage Pre-Flop The Flop The Turn The River
Carlos Mortensen 17.4% 48.5% 25.0%
Dewey Tomko 82.6% 51.5% 75.0%
Action:
Carlos Mortensen had a 2-to-1-chip guide when he and Dewey Tomko played the last hand of the competition.
Mortensen increased to $100,000 with the K -Q  and Tomko flat-called with the A -A  in a challenge to catch Mortensen.
The flop shows J -T -3  providing Mortensen two over cards, the nut straight-draw and a king-high flush draw.
Mortensen wage out one more $100,000 and Tomko increased $400,000.
Mortensen reacted by affecting all-in on a semi-bluff and Tomko called with his remaining $1,500,000.
Mortensen was drawing to nine clubs, three nines and one ace providing him 13 outs in total. The three on the turn destroy his outs to the ace-high straight.
However, when the 9  strike on the river he made the nut-straight.
The hand won Mortensen the title and $1,500,000 in real money.
This was the second time that Tomko ended second in the competition.
Analysis:
Both performers played their hands excellently in this pan.
Even if Tomko had stimulated all-in on the flop, Mortensen would most likely have called, having as much outs as he did.
Once the flop shows and Mortensen wages out, they were both more or less fascinated into playing their hands for all their chips.
Texas Holdem No-Limit WORLD SERIES OF POKER (WSOP) 2000
- $10,000 Main Event: A kicker that got out kicked
Chris Ferguson
VS T.J. Cloutier
Best hand percentage Pre-Flop The Flop The Turn The River
Chris Ferguson 25.9% 15.2% 13.6%
T.J. Cloutier 74.9% 84.8% 86.4%
Action:
When T.J. Cloutier and Chris Ferguson starts playing heads-up, Cloutier had $400,000 and Ferguson had $4,700,000.
Cloutier, by now, managed to take the chip guide away from Ferguson.
However, Ferguson was back in the guide when the last hand of the competition was played. Cloutier encouraged all-in with the A -Q  and Ferguson called him with the A -9 .
The flop shows 2 -K -4 , providing no support to either competitor.
The turn was the K  and on the river the 9  fell, providing Ferguson a pair of nines.
Ferguson won the title and $1,500,000 in real money.
Analysis:
Cloutier scurried this heads-up competition in his book “Championship Tournament Practice Hands” co-written with Tom McEvoy.
In his personal words he felt that Ferguson was nervous since he was being outplayed by Cloutier and was probably to make an error on a hand.
He made that error when he called Cloutier’s all-in wage before the flop with the A -9 .
However, he got fortunate and won the pan.
Texas Holdem No-Limit WORLD SERIES OF POKER (WSOP) 1999
- $10,000 Main Event: The small pocket pairs
Noel Furlong
VS Alan Goehring
Best hand percentage Pre-Flop The Flop The Turn The River
Noel Furlong 18.6% 83.2% 90.9%
Alan Goehring 81.4% 16.8% 9.1%
Action:
Noel Furlong shuffled from the little blind with the 5 -5  and Goehring checked from the large blind holding the 6 -6 . The flop shows Q -Q -5  and both performers checked.
On the turn the 2  strike.
Goehring checked once more and Furlong wage $150,000.
Goehring increased $300,000 and Furlong stimulated all-in.
Goehring called and comprehend he was drawing to only four outs (either a queen or a six).
No support came for Goehring on the river and Furlong became the 1999 World conqueror, winning $1,000,000 in real money.
Analysis:
Goehring could have increased before the flop.
However, he would have been in difficulty either way since Furlong would most probably have called.
Furlong almost certainly even calls an all-in wage in this mark.
Texas Holdem No-Limit WORLD SERIES OF POKER (WSOP) 1998
- $10,000 Main Event: “I play the board”
Scotty Nguyen
VS Kevin McBride
Best hand percentage Pre-Flop The Flop The Turn The River
Scotty Nguyen 34.2% 94.8% 97.7%
Kevin McBride 65.8% 5.2% 2.3%
Action:
When playing heads-up, Kevin McBride increased $50,000 with the Q -T  and Scotty Nguyen called with the J -9 .
The flop shows 8 -9 -9 , providing Nguyen trip nines and McBride a gut-shot straight draw with two over cards.
Nguyen checked and McBride bet $100,000 on a semi-bluff.
After thinking for a while Nguyen called.
The turn carries out the 8 , providing McBride a straight flush draw and Nguyen a full house.
Only the J  could give McBride the most excellent hand at this point.
Nguyen checked and once more
McBride wage $100,000.
Nguyen called and the river card was the 8 , which made a full house on the panel.
Nguyen waged out at that moment $310,000, which would put McBride all-in if he determinate to call.
It seems that Nguyen said to McBride while he was thinking, “You call, gonna be all over baby.” McBride replies, “I call. I play the panel.”
This hand won Nguyen the title and $1,000,000 in real money.
Analysis:
When Nguyen check-calls a wage on both the flop and turn, McBride should have apprehended that he either held a nine or an eight.
Nguyens big wage on the river is excellent because the large wage made it seems more as he was bluffing.
However, calling off all his chips in the desires off opening the pan was not a fine move by McBride.
Texas Holdem No-Limit WORLD SERIES OF POKER (WSOP) 1997
- $10,000 Main Event: Slow-playing a marginal hand
Stu Ungar
VS Mel Judah
Best hand percentage Pre-Flop The Flop The Turn The River
Stu Ungar 65.8% 76.4% 88.6%
Mel Judah 34.2% 23.6% 11.4%
Action:
When the final table was down to three performers (Stu Ungar, Mel Judah and John Strzemp) the following hand show up.
Mel Judah made a $60,000 increase on the button with the 10 -9 , Stu “The Kid” Ungar called from the little blind with the Q -J  and Strzemp threw in the largeblind.
The flop shows J -3 -10 , providing Ungar peak pair and Judah second pair.
Ungar checked and Judah checked after him.
On the turn the 2  strike and Ungar bet $80,000 at the pan.
Judah called the $80,000 and increased it one more $162,000, placing himself all-in.
Ungar thought for a moment but called the $162,000 increase.
When the hands were turned over, each one could observe that Judah was drawing to 5 outs with just one more card to come.
On the river the K  strike and sent Judah out in third place.
Ungar, ultimately went on to win the competition and his third $10,000 WORLD SERIES OF POKER (WSOP) title.
Analysis:
Ungar set this hand up wonderfully by betting in a spot were he had much to win and not so much to lose.
His check on the flop made Judah consider that there was a logical possibility that he was either bluffing or drawing when he wage on the turn.
It was this play that made Judah shift in on the turn.
Although, Judah might had done the same thing on the flop if Ungar had waged.
However,  it is doubtful because Ungar had much of chips and recognize that he had set up Judah to shift in on the turn.
His call on the turn was exact.
Had Judah waged on the flop he most probably would have been capable to get away from the hand without losing his whole load.
Texas Holdem No-Limit WORLD SERIES OF POKER (WSOP) 1997
- $10,000 Main Event: A stone cold bluff
Stu Ungar
VS Ron Stanley
Best hand percentage Pre-Flop The Flop The Turn The River
Stu Ungar 63.0% 25.4% 22.7%
Ron Stanley 37.0% 74.6% 77.3%
Action:
It was down to the final four performers in the event when the following occurred.
Ron Stanley shuffled from the little blind with the 9 -7  and the late poker myth Stu Ungar checked from the large blind with a Q -T .
The flop shows A -6 -9 , providing Stanley a pair of nines and no help for Ungar.
Stanley checked and Ungar checked after him.
On the turn the 8  strike providing Stanley an open-finished straight draw to go with his nines. Ungar, at the moment had a gut-shot straight draw and two over cards to Stanley’s pair.
If a T strike on the river Ungar would make a better pair than Stanley.
However, this card would also provide Stanley a straight.
In brief, Ungar needed a Q or a J to make the better hand.
Stanley bet $25,000 and Ungar re-increased him $60,000 on a semi-bluff, hoping Stanley would threw out.
Stanley went into the tank however lastly called.
The K  strikes on the river, not supporting any competitor.
However, it was a risky card for Stanley because there were at the moment, two overcards on the panel to his pair.
There was around $200,000 in the pan behind Stanley’s call.
Stanley checked and Ungar wage $220,000 into the pan.
Stanley thought for a while and then unwillingly threw out.
Ungar determinate to prove his bluff as he was gathering the pan.
This made Stanley lose his self-assurance next to the chips lost in the pan.
Stu Ungar finally won the competition and became the only participant ever to win the Big One three times.
Analysis:
Had Stanley waged on the flop it is probably that he would have won the pan right there.
As an alternative, he decided to catch Ungar with a scrawny hand or he didn’t know what to do with the hand.
When Ungar increased on the turn Stanley should have moved all-in or threw out.
Ungar has hit and then Stanley must attempt to outdraw him or he is bluffing.
With so much straight draws and a flush draw on the panel, approximately any card is a worry card for Stanley.
So a call here is an awful move.
It is worth to declare that Ungar had checked peak pair on the flop a few moments before this hand shown up and then wage/increased on the turn.
He had set Stanley up for this game.
Ungar must have stink weak spot in Stanley on the turn and comprehend that he had a probability to bluff him on the river in case Stanley would check to him.
Texas Holdem No-Limit WORLD SERIES OF POKER (WSOP) 1997
- $10,000 Main Event: A mistake or a great play?
Stu Ungar
VS John Strzemp
Best hand percentage Pre-Flop The Flop The Turn The River
Stu Ungar 34.8% 34.8% 42.0%
John Strzemp 65.2% 65.2% 58.0%
Action:
When the last hand shown up between two-time World winner Stu Ungar and John Strzemp, Ungar held a 4-to-1 chip improvement.
Ungar increased to $40,000 with the A -4  and Strzemp called with the A -8 .
The flop shows A -5 -3 , providing both competitors peak pair.
Strzemp had the guide with the nice kicker; however, Ungar had a gut-shot straight draw to go with his pair.
Strzemp wage $120,000 on the flop and Ungar thought for a while before he stimulated all-in.
Strzemp called all-in.
The turn carries out the 3 , providing Ungar 20 outs for a split pan and 7 outs to win.
The 2  threw on the river, providing Ungar a 5-high straight, his third title and $1,000,000 in real money.
Analysis:
When Ungar stimulated in on Strzemp he must have been considering that Strzemp could have had a better ace than him, since there were no probably draws on the flop.
However, it wasn’t probably to have been a big ace like AK or AQ because he wasn’t rein creased pre-flop.
Because he had the chip guide, he decided to shift wishing that Strzemp would throw out a weak ace.
If he was called and Strzemp held a hand such as A8 or A7, Ungar still had around a 35% of drawing out.
He didn’t threat so much here because they would be around even in chips had he lost the hand.
Strzemp just have been unsuccessful that Ungar drew out on him.
This is how Ungar himself seeking of his play in the competition: “I played a great play-offs. I’m not joking. If each hand from opening to ends were filmed “each wage, each very increase, even each threw out” contestants would observe a typical presentation.
It was a no-limit hold’em private clinic.”
Texas Holdem No-Limit WORLD SERIES OF POKER (WSOP) 1996
- $10,000 Main Event: Overplaying middle pair
Huck Seed
VS Van Horn
Best hand percentage Pre-Flop The Flop The Turn The River
Huck Seed 33.1% 83.9% 75.0%
Van Horn 66.9% 16.1% 25.0%
Action:
When the final hand shown up, Huck Seed had the chip guide after doubling up with pocket Q’s opposite to Van Horns AJ.
In the final hand Van Horn increased with the K -8  and Seed called with the 9 -8 .
The flop shown 9 -8 -4 , providing Seed top two-pair and Van Horn middle pair with an over card.
Seed waged out on the flop.
Van Horn increased and Seed re-increased Van Horn all-in.
Van Horn called.
The A  strike on the turn, providing Van Horn nine outs to the nut flush, making it twelve outs in total.
The 3  strike on the river and won Seed the title and $1,000,000 in real money.
Analysis:
Van Horn appear to have played this hand so violently.
He likely should have either smooth called Seed on the flop or increased an amount that he could get away from, in case Seed would come over the top.
Seed wasn’t probably to be drawing when he waged out and then re-increased on the flop.
It seems such he was trying to defend a hand made.

Relive Historical Poker Hands

Texas Holdem No-Limit WORLD SERIES OF POKER (WSOP) 2007

- $10,000 Main Event: Silencing the Lam

Jerry Yang

VS Tuan Lam

Best hand percentage Pre-Flop The Flop The Turn The River

Jerry Yang 52.6% 12.0% 13.6%

Tuan Lam 47.0% 88.0% 86.4%

Action:

Jerry Yang enter the final table as one of the short loads.

He gets out combating and speedily grasps the chip guide.

Yang’s aggressive play provides him also a giant break off guidel coming into heads-up play opposite to Tuan Lam, holding 80% of the chips in play at around 102 million.

Lam has 25.4 million. With the blinds at 400,000/800,000 and a 100,000-chip bet, Yang looks down at 8 -8  and makes an increase to 2.3 million.

Lam seems down at A -Q  and progresses all-in over the peak. Yang takes a time and finally calls the wage, putting Lam’s play-offs life at wager.

However, when the flop shows 5 -Q -9 , Lam takes a throttlehold on the hand.

Yang will require to catch one of the outstanding eights or running cards to win.

When the turn carries the 7 , though, it adds four guts hot outs to Yang’s two residual eights.

The river carries the 6  and calamity for Tuan Lam, giving Yang a winning nine-high straight, the World Series of Poker Major Incident bracelet and $8.25 million.

Analysis:

Yang builds a regular 3x the large blind with his 8 -8 . Lam, deliberating Yang has been playing very antagonistically, has no choice however to move all-in with his short load and A -Q .

Once the flop shows down, Lam becomes a colossal preferred.

However, Yang gets fortunate and catches two running cards to do a straight.

The strike looks much shoddier than it was at that moment.

When the money went in, Yang was simply a insignificant favorite for the coin flip with his pocket pair.

Texas Holdem No-Limit WORLD SERIES OF POKER (WSOP) 2006

- $10,000 Main Event: Talking Your Way to a competition

Jamie Gold

VS Paul Wasicka

Best hand percentage Pre-Flop The Flop The Turn The River

Jamie Gold 28.6% 86.5% 95.5%

Paul Wasicka 71.0% 13.5% 4.5%

Action:

Jamie Gold go into heads-up and play with a colossal chip guide.

Having grabbed the chip guide untimely in the competition and gathering chips the whole mode. Entering the heads-up competition, Gold out-chips, Paul Wasicka 4.5-1.

After some hands of heads-up, Wasicka has a load of more or less 16.2 million, while Gold has a massive load of around 73.9 million.

The hand starts with blinds at 200,000/400,000 and a 50,000 bet.

Gold completes from the switch with Q -9 . Wasicka looks down at T -T  and increases to 1.3 million.

Gold do the call.

The flop shows Q -8 -5 . Wasicka wages out 1.5 million.

Gold, serenely assert he is all-in.

Wasicka tanks while Gold enters one of his actually infamous converses.

Ultimately Wasicka, considering Gold is on a draw, does the call.

When Gold turns up his pair of queens, the young phantom is down to two outs.

The turn carries the A , and the 4   river card close the deal.

Gold is the new World Series of Poker Major Incident Winner and takes home $12 million and the impressive Major Incident bracelet.

Analysis:

Jamie Gold shuffles the button yet once more; a very scrawny play, particularly heads-up.

If you have a hand value playing, you should absolutely carry it in for an elevated from the button.

However, Gold chooses to shuffle and Wasicka discovers himself with an excellent hand heads-up. His T -T  makes for an excellent increasing hand and he makes it 1.3 million to go, around 3x the big blind.

Gold do his call with place and his gigantic chip load and we observe a flop.

The Q -8 -5  carries trouble for Wasicka, with an overcard to his tens.

He makes a persistence wage of just over half the pot, 1.5 million.

Gold then over wages all-in.

Just little hands prior, a very comparable hand had played out.

In a three-way pan with Wasicka and Michael Binger, Gold shuffle the button and then over wage all-in after a wage from one of his antagonists.

Binger finishes up calling with peak pair, peak kicker and Gold drew out to a straight.

With this clean hand in Wasicka’s brain, he recognized Gold was able of quick playing draws. The flop made fairly little eventual draws.

Accordingly, Wasicka went with his read on Gold and ultimately made the call.

Regrettably for him, Gold held a pair of queens and Wasicka was drawing very slight.

Texas Holdem No-Limit WORLD SERIES OF POKER (WSOP) 2005

- $10,000 Main Event: From rag to riches

Joseph Hachem

VS Steven Dannenmann

Best hand percentage Pre-Flop The Flop The Turn The River

Joseph Hachem 26.0% 83.3% 93.2%

Steven Dannenmann 72.5% 5.0% 6.8%

Action:

After seven days of playing, the following outspreaded at the final table only about half an hour into the heads-up play:

Hachem and Dannenmann had correspondingly $40 million and $16.35 million in chips at the openings of this hand.

The blinds were $150,000-$300,000 with a $50,000 bet!

Steven Dannenmann increased to $700,000 with the A -3  and Hachem do a apparently loose call with the 7 -3 . The flop shows 4 -5 -6 .

Hachem checked his straight and Steven bet $700,000 into the pan.

Hachem re-increased to $1,700,000 and Steven flat called holding only ace-high and an open ended straight draw.

The turn was the A .

Hachem wages out $2,000,000 and Steven increased to $5,000,000.

Hachem went all-in and Steven immediately called.

Steven was drawing to a knot with one of the three outstanding sevens on the river.

The river was the 4  and Joseph Hachem became the new World Winner, winning $7,500,000!

Analysis:

Increasing with any ace in heads-up play is a fine play, however $700,000 is a small move up.

Certainly, it was hardly twice the large blind.

With $1,050,000 in the pan and only $400,000 more to call, Hachem is receiving the right price to call with any two cards, particularly being the chip head.

Hachem calls appropriately the move up and checks on the flop in an effort to trap Dannenmann. Steven wages roughly half the pan thinking his ace-high might be the greatest hand.

A logical wage even though the panel is intimidating.

Hachem make a decision not to sluggish play his straight any more and increases the pan one more million.

A good increase since there are moderately little free cards that can potentially harm his hand (in veracity he is in large form however he doesn’t recognize that for sure).

Dannenmann calls and the pan, at the moment, holds $4,850,000, which is more than 25% of Steven’s total load.

The call point toward Steven’s plan which is to distinguish if his ace-high is fine or else he imagines he can outdraw if one of his straight cards strikes.

Also an ace could probably make him the finest hand.

Undeniably, a risky call, however remains practical.

On the turn the A  strikes and that finishes up being a money card for Hachem.

He guides out again with a $2,000,000 wage and Dannenmann, believing his pair of aces is the best hand, increases to $5,000,000.

This is a dangerous position for Steven; on the one hand, his hand is not exceedingly strong and, on the other hand, the panel is risky enough that he doesn’t want to tolerate Hachem to observe the river so inexpensively.

The wage by Hachem is an excellent move since it is little enough to tolerate Steven to believe that he can increase Hachem off his hand by putting in an increase of $3,000,000.

At this moment, Hachem set Dannenmann all-in and Dannenmann, who, in light of the reality that he was very much pot devoted (50% of his original load was in the pan) and quite probably could have been holding the most excellent hand, do the call.

This last call by Dannenmann is a decision call based less on pan probabilities and more on the possibility of him having the top hand.

Texas Holdem No-Limit WORLD SERIES OF POKER (WSOP) 2004

- $10,000 Main Event: Value-betting until the river

Greg Raymer

VS David Williams

Best hand percentage Pre-Flop The Flop The Turn The River

Greg Raymer 69.8% 66.4% 79.5%

David Williams 29.8% 31.0% 20.5%

Action:

After 6 days of direct and continuous playing, the final hand of the 2004 WORLD SERIES OF POKER (WSOP) was played out.

The two remaining qualified online competitors were Greg “Fossilman” Raymer and the 23years old poker expert David Williams.

Raymer was chief by around 2-to-1 with roughly $17,125,000 chips in opposite to Williams’ $8,240,000, with blinds of $50,000-$100,000.

Williams increased to $300,000 on the button holding the A -4  and Raymer called from the largeblind with the 8 -8 .

The flop shows 4 -2 -5 .

Raymer checked and Williams immediately wage $500,000.

Raymer took his time and then increased to $1,600,000.

Promply, Williams called his wage. The turn carry the 2 .

Raymer confirmed a wage of $2,500,000 and once more Williams immediately called.

The river was the 2 , giving both competitors a full house.

Raymer contemplate for a second before proclaiming he was all-in.

For the first time in the hand, Williams also took at least a second or two previous to calling and turn over his hand face-up earlier than Raymer who had a possibility to do so.

Raymer gazed down at Williams’ card and then turn over the winning hand.

One second later, he increased both his hands in the air and squealed out in delight.

First place provided Greg Raymer $5,000,000 in prize money, the biggest play-offs prize ever won.

Analysis:

Pre-flop, both performers played their hands according to standard poker conjecture.

Raymer strikes a pleasant flop and decided to check-increase the violent Williams, (a smart play).

A check-call would not be an ideal play here since there are a lot of draws on the panel and that would make it so inexpensive on Williams.

Williams also wages properly the flop, since he had a gut-shot straight draw and middle pair with peak kicker.

When he received got check-increased, he should have either stimulated all-in or run away, rather than starting a prototype of calling his short load.

Raymer understood appropriately that he had the most excellent hand all the way and was merely “value- waging” on each round,

As a result Williams pays for frustrating to outdraw Raymer.

Texas Holdem No-Limit WORLD SERIES OF POKER (WSOP) 2003

- $10,000 Main Event: The power of rags

Chris Moneymaker

VS Sam Farha

Best hand percentage Pre-Flop The Flop The Turn The River

Chris Moneymaker 36.1% 75.5% 81.8%

Sam Farha 63.9% 24.5% 18.2%

Action:

After playing heads-up for a little hand Chris Moneymaker had the chip guide going into this pan opposite to Sam Farha.

Moneymaker had around $6,600,000 and Farha $1,800,000 in chips.

Farha had the J -T  and increased to $100,000 from the small blind and Moneymaker called with the 5 -4 .

The flop shows J -5 -4 , providing Moneymaker bottom two-pair and Farha peak pair.

Moneymaker checked and Farha waged $175,000.

Moneymaker check-increase $275,000 and Farha moved all-in.

Moneymaker called.

The two-pair held up and even enhanced on the river to a full house.

This hand won Moneymaker the title and $2,500,000 in real money.

Analysis:

Moneymaker played this hand excellently and fascinated Farha for all his chips.

The check on the flop provided Farha the alternative to bluff in case he didn’t hit.

The little check-increased put Farha in a position where he had to make a decision whether his hand was the best or not.

The check-increase is so little to make Farha threw out and if he just calls.

Moneymaker will most likely set him all-in on the turn.

Texas Holdem No-Limit WORLD SERIES OF POKER (WSOP) 2002

- $10,000 Main Event: Semi-bluffing on the flop

Robert Varkonyi

VS Julian Gardner

Best hand percentage Pre-Flop The Flop The Turn The River

Robert Varkonyi 61.0% 66.2% 75.0%

Julian Gardner 39.0% 33.8% 25.0%

Action:

The unsighted were $20,000-$40,000 and the gamble $5,000 when the last hand of the competition was played.

Varkonyi had around a 6-to-1 chip guide going into this pan.

Varkonyi increased $90,000 with the Q -T  and Gardner called with the J -8 . The droop shows Q -4 -4 , giving Varkonyi peak pair and Gardner a flush draw.

Gardner checked and Varkonyi wage $50,000, a little wages.

Gardner is determinate to shift all-in with $765,000 on a semi-bluff.

Varkonyi called. The flush shows on the river, however the 10  gave Varkonyi a full house.

Varkonyi won the title with $2,000,000 in real money.

Analysis:

When Gardner was determinate to bluff Varkonyi, the panel didn’t seem so frightening and he had enough chips to do a considerable increase.

If called Gardner recognizes he is probably to have at least 9 outs to draw out with.

However, Varkonyi do a fine call and his cards held up.

Varkonyi deserved the title and $2,000,000 in real money.

Texas Holdem No-Limit WORLD SERIES OF POKER (WSOP) 2001

- $10,000 Main Event: Being overly aggressive

Phil Hellmuth

VS Carlos Mortensen

Best hand percentage Pre-Flop The Flop The Turn The River

Phil Hellmuth 26.0% 14.3% 18.2%

Carlos Mortensen 74.0% 85.7% 81.8%

Action:

A huge hand appears between the world winners from 1989, Phil Hellmuth and Carlos Mortensen, when the final table was down to five performers.

The blinds were $15,000-$30,000 and the bet was $6,000.

Building the pan $75,000 before the cards were contracted.

Hellmuth shuffled into the pan, Phil Gordon shuffled in from the button, Carlos Mortensen shuffled in, from the little blind and Stan Schrier in the large blind checked.

The four-way pan had $150,000 in it before the droop.

The flop shows Q -9 -4 . Mortensen checked, Schrier checked, Hellmuth wage $60,000 (less then half of the pan), Gordon threw out, Mortensen increased $200,000 and Schrier took about two minutes to threw out, since, he hadn’t comprehend, it was his turn to proceed.

At the moment, the pan had $410,000 in it and Phil Hellmuth, promptly proclaimed that he was affecting all-in with his last $900,000.

Mortensen called and the hands were turned up on the table.

Hellmuth held a Q-T and Mortensen had a Q-J, giving both actors peak pair.

However, Hellmuth had the scrawny kicker.

At this time, Hellmuth had 3 outs to a T for a two pair to strike Mortensen.

On the turn a J strikes, providing Hellmuth an open-finished straight draw and Mortensen peak two pair.

The J helped Hellmuth since it provided him 8 new outs.

However killed his 3 outs to the T. He needed an 8 or a K to strike on the river to do a straight. The A  came on the river and sent Phil Hellmuth out in fifth position.

Analysis:

Hellmuth’s firstwage is a fine wage and it is not large enough to make him pan dedicated.

So he should be able to leave the hand.

When Hellmuth shifted his chips all-in he could merely strike a bluff or make Mortensen put down the better hand.

Since the pan was not increased with four performers, it was improbably that Hellmuth’s hand was the best after he has been check-increased by Mortensen.

Mortensen could embrace any two pair, a set of 9′s or 4′s, AQ, KQ, QJ or the J -T  that would make him the preferred over one pair.

Mortensen might have made similar play with the A -9 , a JT and any Q, in that case Mortensen might have crinkled.

However, that still doesn’t make Hellmuth’s play exactly.

Texas Holdem No-Limit WORLD SERIES OF POKER (WSOP) 2001

- $10,000 Main Event: Trapping with aces

Carlos Mortensen

VS Dewey Tomko

Best hand percentage Pre-Flop The Flop The Turn The River

Carlos Mortensen 17.4% 48.5% 25.0%

Dewey Tomko 82.6% 51.5% 75.0%

Action:

Carlos Mortensen had a 2-to-1-chip guide when he and Dewey Tomko played the last hand of the competition.

Mortensen increased to $100,000 with the K -Q  and Tomko flat-called with the A -A  in a challenge to catch Mortensen.

The flop shows J -T -3  providing Mortensen two over cards, the nut straight-draw and a king-high flush draw.

Mortensen wage out one more $100,000 and Tomko increased $400,000.

Mortensen reacted by affecting all-in on a semi-bluff and Tomko called with his remaining $1,500,000.

Mortensen was drawing to nine clubs, three nines and one ace providing him 13 outs in total. The three on the turn destroy his outs to the ace-high straight.

However, when the 9  strike on the river he made the nut-straight.

The hand won Mortensen the title and $1,500,000 in real money.

This was the second time that Tomko ended second in the competition.

Analysis:

Both performers played their hands excellently in this pan.

Even if Tomko had stimulated all-in on the flop, Mortensen would most likely have called, having as much outs as he did.

Once the flop shows and Mortensen wages out, they were both more or less fascinated into playing their hands for all their chips.

Texas Holdem No-Limit WORLD SERIES OF POKER (WSOP) 2000

- $10,000 Main Event: A kicker that got out kicked

Chris Ferguson

VS T.J. Cloutier

Best hand percentage Pre-Flop The Flop The Turn The River

Chris Ferguson 25.9% 15.2% 13.6%

T.J. Cloutier 74.9% 84.8% 86.4%

Action:

When T.J. Cloutier and Chris Ferguson starts playing heads-up, Cloutier had $400,000 and Ferguson had $4,700,000.

Cloutier, by now, managed to take the chip guide away from Ferguson.

However, Ferguson was back in the guide when the last hand of the competition was played. Cloutier encouraged all-in with the A -Q  and Ferguson called him with the A -9 .

The flop shows 2 -K -4 , providing no support to either competitor.

The turn was the K  and on the river the 9  fell, providing Ferguson a pair of nines.

Ferguson won the title and $1,500,000 in real money.

Analysis:

Cloutier scurried this heads-up competition in his book “Championship Tournament Practice Hands” co-written with Tom McEvoy.

In his personal words he felt that Ferguson was nervous since he was being outplayed by Cloutier and was probably to make an error on a hand.

He made that error when he called Cloutier’s all-in wage before the flop with the A -9 .

However, he got fortunate and won the pan.

Texas Holdem No-Limit WORLD SERIES OF POKER (WSOP) 1999

- $10,000 Main Event: The small pocket pairs

Noel Furlong

VS Alan Goehring

Best hand percentage Pre-Flop The Flop The Turn The River

Noel Furlong 18.6% 83.2% 90.9%

Alan Goehring 81.4% 16.8% 9.1%

Action:

Noel Furlong shuffled from the little blind with the 5 -5  and Goehring checked from the large blind holding the 6 -6 . The flop shows Q -Q -5  and both performers checked.

On the turn the 2  strike.

Goehring checked once more and Furlong wage $150,000.

Goehring increased $300,000 and Furlong stimulated all-in.

Goehring called and comprehend he was drawing to only four outs (either a queen or a six).

No support came for Goehring on the river and Furlong became the 1999 World conqueror, winning $1,000,000 in real money.

Analysis:

Goehring could have increased before the flop.

However, he would have been in difficulty either way since Furlong would most probably have called.

Furlong almost certainly even calls an all-in wage in this mark.

Texas Holdem No-Limit WORLD SERIES OF POKER (WSOP) 1998

- $10,000 Main Event: “I play the board”

Scotty Nguyen

VS Kevin McBride

Best hand percentage Pre-Flop The Flop The Turn The River

Scotty Nguyen 34.2% 94.8% 97.7%

Kevin McBride 65.8% 5.2% 2.3%

Action:

When playing heads-up, Kevin McBride increased $50,000 with the Q -T  and Scotty Nguyen called with the J -9 .

The flop shows 8 -9 -9 , providing Nguyen trip nines and McBride a gut-shot straight draw with two over cards.

Nguyen checked and McBride bet $100,000 on a semi-bluff.

After thinking for a while Nguyen called.

The turn carries out the 8 , providing McBride a straight flush draw and Nguyen a full house.

Only the J  could give McBride the most excellent hand at this point.

Nguyen checked and once more

McBride wage $100,000.

Nguyen called and the river card was the 8 , which made a full house on the panel.

Nguyen waged out at that moment $310,000, which would put McBride all-in if he determinate to call.

It seems that Nguyen said to McBride while he was thinking, “You call, gonna be all over baby.” McBride replies, “I call. I play the panel.”

This hand won Nguyen the title and $1,000,000 in real money.

Analysis:

When Nguyen check-calls a wage on both the flop and turn, McBride should have apprehended that he either held a nine or an eight.

Nguyens big wage on the river is excellent because the large wage made it seems more as he was bluffing.

However, calling off all his chips in the desires off opening the pan was not a fine move by McBride.

Texas Holdem No-Limit WORLD SERIES OF POKER (WSOP) 1997

- $10,000 Main Event: Slow-playing a marginal hand

Stu Ungar

VS Mel Judah

Best hand percentage Pre-Flop The Flop The Turn The River

Stu Ungar 65.8% 76.4% 88.6%

Mel Judah 34.2% 23.6% 11.4%

Action:

When the final table was down to three performers (Stu Ungar, Mel Judah and John Strzemp) the following hand show up.

Mel Judah made a $60,000 increase on the button with the 10 -9 , Stu “The Kid” Ungar called from the little blind with the Q -J  and Strzemp threw in the largeblind.

The flop shows J -3 -10 , providing Ungar peak pair and Judah second pair.

Ungar checked and Judah checked after him.

On the turn the 2  strike and Ungar bet $80,000 at the pan.

Judah called the $80,000 and increased it one more $162,000, placing himself all-in.

Ungar thought for a moment but called the $162,000 increase.

When the hands were turned over, each one could observe that Judah was drawing to 5 outs with just one more card to come.

On the river the K  strike and sent Judah out in third place.

Ungar, ultimately went on to win the competition and his third $10,000 WORLD SERIES OF POKER (WSOP) title.

Analysis:

Ungar set this hand up wonderfully by betting in a spot were he had much to win and not so much to lose.

His check on the flop made Judah consider that there was a logical possibility that he was either bluffing or drawing when he wage on the turn.

It was this play that made Judah shift in on the turn.

Although, Judah might had done the same thing on the flop if Ungar had waged.

However,  it is doubtful because Ungar had much of chips and recognize that he had set up Judah to shift in on the turn.

His call on the turn was exact.

Had Judah waged on the flop he most probably would have been capable to get away from the hand without losing his whole load.

Texas Holdem No-Limit WORLD SERIES OF POKER (WSOP) 1997

- $10,000 Main Event: A stone cold bluff

Stu Ungar

VS Ron Stanley

Best hand percentage Pre-Flop The Flop The Turn The River

Stu Ungar 63.0% 25.4% 22.7%

Ron Stanley 37.0% 74.6% 77.3%

Action:

It was down to the final four performers in the event when the following occurred.

Ron Stanley shuffled from the little blind with the 9 -7  and the late poker myth Stu Ungar checked from the large blind with a Q -T .

The flop shows A -6 -9 , providing Stanley a pair of nines and no help for Ungar.

Stanley checked and Ungar checked after him.

On the turn the 8  strike providing Stanley an open-finished straight draw to go with his nines. Ungar, at the moment had a gut-shot straight draw and two over cards to Stanley’s pair.

If a T strike on the river Ungar would make a better pair than Stanley.

However, this card would also provide Stanley a straight.

In brief, Ungar needed a Q or a J to make the better hand.

Stanley placed a bet of 25,000 thousand dollars but Ungar re-increased him with $60,000 on a semi-bluff, hoping Stanley would threw out.

Stanley went into the tank however lastly called.

The K  strikes on the river, not supporting any competitor.

However, it was a risky card for Stanley because there were at the moment, two overcards on the panel to his pair.

There was around $200,000 in the pan behind Stanley’s call.

Stanley checked and Ungar wage $220,000 into the pan.

Stanley thought for a while and then unwillingly threw out.

Ungar determinate to prove his bluff as he was gathering the pan.

This made Stanley lose his self-assurance next to the chips lost in the pan.

Stu Ungar finally won the competition and became the only participant ever to win the Big One three times.

Analysis:

Had Stanley waged on the flop it is probably that he would have won the pan right there.

As an alternative, he decided to catch Ungar with a scrawny hand or he didn’t know what to do with the hand.

When Ungar increased on the turn Stanley should have moved all-in or threw out.

Ungar has hit and then Stanley must attempt to outdraw him or he is bluffing.

With so much straight draws and a flush draw on the panel, approximately any card is a worry card for Stanley.

So a call here is an awful move.

It is worth to declare that Ungar had checked peak pair on the flop a few moments before this hand shown up and then wage/increased on the turn.

He had set Stanley up for this game.

Ungar must have stink weak spot in Stanley on the turn and comprehend that he had a probability to bluff him on the river in case Stanley would check to him.

Texas Holdem No-Limit WORLD SERIES OF POKER (WSOP) 1997

- $10,000 Main Event: A mistake or a great play?

Stu Ungar

VS John Strzemp

Best hand percentage Pre-Flop The Flop The Turn The River

Stu Ungar 34.8% 34.8% 42.0%

John Strzemp 65.2% 65.2% 58.0%

Action:

When the last hand shown up between two-time World winner Stu Ungar and John Strzemp, Ungar held a 4-to-1 chip improvement.

Ungar increased to $40,000 with the A -4  and Strzemp called with the A -8 .

The flop shows A -5 -3 , providing both competitors peak pair.

Strzemp had the guide with the nice kicker; however, Ungar had a gut-shot straight draw to go with his pair.

Strzemp wage $120,000 on the flop and Ungar thought for a while before he stimulated all-in.

Strzemp called all-in.

The turn carries out the 3 , providing Ungar 20 outs for a split pan and 7 outs to win.

The 2  threw on the river, providing Ungar a 5-high straight, his third title and $1,000,000 in real money.

Analysis:

When Ungar stimulated in on Strzemp he must have been considering that Strzemp could have had a better ace than him, since there were no probably draws on the flop.

However, it wasn’t probably to have been a big ace like AK or AQ because he wasn’t rein creased pre-flop.

Because he had the chip guide, he decided to shift wishing that Strzemp would throw out a weak ace.

If he was called and Strzemp held a hand such as A8 or A7, Ungar still had around a 35% of drawing out.

He didn’t threat so much here because they would be around even in chips had he lost the hand.

Strzemp just have been unsuccessful that Ungar drew out on him.

This is how Ungar himself seeking of his play in the competition: “I played a great play-offs. I’m not joking. If each hand from opening to ends were filmed “each wage, each very increase, even each threw out” contestants would observe a typical presentation.

It was a no-limit hold’em private clinic.”

Texas Holdem No-Limit WORLD SERIES OF POKER (WSOP) 1996

- $10,000 Main Event: Overplaying middle pair

Huck Seed

VS Van Horn

Best hand percentage Pre-Flop The Flop The Turn The River

Huck Seed 33.1% 83.9% 75.0%

Van Horn 66.9% 16.1% 25.0%

Action:

When the final hand shown up, Huck Seed had the chip guide after doubling up with pocket Q’s opposite to Van Horns AJ.

In the final hand Van Horn increased with the K -8  and Seed called with the 9 -8 .

The flop shown 9 -8 -4 , providing Seed top two-pair and Van Horn middle pair with an over card.

Seed waged out on the flop.

Van Horn increased and Seed re-increased Van Horn all-in.

Van Horn called.

The A  strike on the turn, providing Van Horn nine outs to the nut flush, making it twelve outs in total.

The 3  strike on the river and won Seed the title and $1,000,000 in real money.

Analysis:

Van Horn appear to have played this hand so violently.

He likely should have either smooth called Seed on the flop or increased an amount that he could get away from, in case Seed would come over the top.

Seed wasn’t probably to be drawing when he waged out and then re-increased on the flop.

It seems such he was trying to defend a hand made.

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